Monthly Archives: October 2010

programmer-tshirts.com shutting shop

Back in 2008 I put together some programmer T-shirt designs to raise money for charity. The project was a modest success, selling 99 t-shirts (92 from zazzle.com and 7 from spreadshirt.com). I was hoping it would have done better, but was somewhat hampered by the high price of print-on-demand T-shirts (especially when you have a charity commission on top) and not finding anyone with the time and skills to make up for my lack of design talent. But it has still raised $302.33+£8.94 to be split between worthy charities sightsavers.org and jaipurfoot.org (plus a generous donation from microISV stalwart Patrick McKenzie).

The 3 most popular designs were:

  1. C++ programmers T-shirt
  2. engineer’s lament T-shirt
  3. I’m coding T-shirt

Sales have now slowed to a trickle. So I don’t intend to renew the programmer-tshirts.com domain and will shut down the shops in the next 7 days to pay out the rest of the commission. If you want to buy one of the t-shirt designs, I suggest you do it now! It would be nice to break 100. If anyone wants the domain I will transfer it for a donation to charity (email me).

Thanks for everyone who helped by sending me T-shirt ideas, linking from their blogs and buying T-shirts. Special thanks to Patrick McKenzie for setting up and hosting the programmer-tshirts.com web site and to Jeff Atwood for running some free ads on stackoverflow.com .

App stores set to dominate future software sales?

Following the success of the iPhone app store (over 6 billion downloads to date), app stores are becoming more and more of a feature of the software landscape. In case you missed it, Apple announced yesterday that there will be an App Store for Macs  ‘within 90 days’. In summary:

  • The Mac app store will be tightly integrated with Mac OS X, including automatic install and update.
  • There will be restrictions on technology, for example Java apps will not be allowed.
  • Apple will keep 30% of any revenue from sales.
  • $99/year subscription for developers.
  • Developers will still be able to sell their software outside the App store.

It is easy to see why Apple would want to do this:

  • A potentially huge new revenue stream from third party Mac software sales.
  • They get even more control over the customer experience.

And this could have advantages for Mac users:

  • Simpler payment and installation.
  • Screening out of low quality apps and malware.

And potential advantages for Mac developers:

  • Mac users might buy more software if it is easier to do so.
  • One main channel to concentrate your marketing efforts on.
  • Some of the boring infrastructure of selling software (licensing, shopping cart etc) can be taken care of by Apple.

But the disadvantages are all too obvious:

  • Your app could be rejected outright. And you won’t know until you submit it for approval. Apple are judge, jury and executioner. The iPhone app store has been infamous its capricious and opaque approval process.
  • 30% is a huge chunk of revenue. Typical payment processors take 5-10% of revenue. Where the new app store cannibalises existing sales (and it is hard to see that it won’t) vendors will lose 20-25% of existing sales revenues.
  • New apps and updates will be delayed by days or weeks as they go through the app store approval process.
  • A single centralised app store is likely to make it harder for niche/long-tail apps to make any sort of living. Certainly this is what seems to be happening in the iPhone App store.
  • Apple are control freaks and have traditionally taken a rather heavy handed approach with developers, including the liberal use of NDAs. The app store will give them even more control.

And worse might follow:

  • Apple makes a lot of their money from selling over-priced hardware. It may be in their interest to drive software prices down so they can sell more hardware. $5 is considered expensive in the iPhone App Store.
  • This could be the first step to making Mac OS X a closed system, like iPhone, where only Apple approved apps can be installed.

I guess they can’t piss off developers too much – a computer without third party applications isn’t going to be very attractive to customers. But I am finding it hard to work up any enthusiasm for a Mac app store. If it is successful I can either be in the store and give up a lot of freedom and cannibalize exisiting sales at a much lower margin, or stay out and be shut out of a large chunk of the market. It isn’t an attractive choice. As my app is written in C++/Qt, rather than Objective-C/Cocoa, I am not even sure that it will be eligible for inclusion in the store. I could just abandon Mac OS X, but Microsoft is also rumoured to be working on their own app store (despite the failure of DigitalLocker). That is a truly terrifying prospect given the awfulness of their ‘Works with Vista’ approval process (I speak from personal experience).

Suddenly web apps are looking more interesting.