About

MUG SHOTI am a UK-based software developer with over twenty five years of professional experience. During that time I have developed a wide range of systems including software for: paper-mill scheduling; satellite image processing; printed circuit board design; environmental modelling; Internet-based distributed systems and seating planning. I have been involved in every aspect of bespoke and shrink-wrap software development, including writing proposals, gathering requirements, design, coding, QA, documentation, sales, marketing, PR and project management. After all this time I still find software development a fascinating challenge.

My main interests are:

  • graphical user interfaces and usability
  • optimisation problems
  • cross-platform software development
  • the software development process and maximising developer productivity
  • effective marketing of software
  • the business side of software

In 2005 I founded my own company, Oryx Digital, to sell shrink-wrap software and provide consulting to other software companies. I have been pleasantly surprised with the success of Oryx Digital’s first product, PerfectTablePlan, which is still under very active development and currently takes up most of my time. I try to find some time to consult for other small software companies, primarily to help with their marketing. I am also running a training course for people who want to start their own software company.

After twenty five years in the business I think I know a bit about what it takes to create successful software. I started this blog in the hope of contributing in some small way to the wider software development community, because I feel the need to sound off on topics related to software and to build the consulting side of my business.

All the photographs on this blog (apart from the one of me above) were taken by me, unless described otherwise. All images and text are copyright Oryx Digital Ltd.

Submitting a guest post

I am happy to consider guest posts for this blog. Your article doesn’t have to be a work of great literature, but it must be:

  • original (not published elsewhere)
  • relevant (related to developing or marketing software products)
  • informative (ideally containing real data)
  • interesting
  • not overly promotional

If you aren’t in the business of developing and marketing software products, or if your job title includes “SEO”, then it is very unlikely that you will be able to write something relevant and interesting. Please don’t insult me by sending SEO-oriented garbage in a feeble attempt to get backlinks.

Andy Brice

Email: andy (at) oryxdigital.com