Category Archives: software

Hammer For Mac static website generator

I prefer static websites to a CMS for simple product websites because:

  • Static websites are fast.
  • I have more low-level control over the HTML/CSS.
  • I don’t have to worry about the very-real threat of a CMS being hacked.

Obviously writing every page separately in raw HTML/CSS would go against one of the cardinal rules of development, Don’t Repeat Yourself. But you can avoid this using a static website generator such as Hammer for Mac.

hammer

Hammer uses a simple syntax embedded in HTML comments to ‘compile’ a website from source files. I have now used Hammer to create several static HTML/CSS websites, including my perfecttableplan.com and hyperplan.com websites.

I like the simple syntax of Hammer. For example:

I can put the HTML for a page header in an _header.html file and then each page just needs to start with:

<!-- @include _header.html -->

I can define and use variables:

<!-- $current_year 2016 -->
..
<p>Copyright <!-- $current_year -->.</p>

And I can let Hammer work out relative paths:

<img src="@path image.png" />

If Hammer can’t make sense of a source file (e.g. it can’t find the image file), it generates a compilation error.

Because everything is text based I can easily manage all the source in a version control system. Also, if I have to move away from Hammer, it should be relatively straightforward to change the syntax to another static generator (or even write a replacement for Hammer!).

Overall I like Hammer. But it does have a number of shortcomings:

1. The user interface is very limited. Hammer shows you a list of source files and you can click on a source file to see the compiled version or edit the source. But the source files are listed in the order they were edited and you can’t filter or sort the list. This seems such a simple and basic feature, that I can’t understand why the developers have omitted it.

2. Hammer takes a dumb, brute force approach to compilation. If you change any file in a source folder, it recompiles *everything*, without checking if other source files include that file. This is a pain if you have 100+ source files. Surely it wouldn’t be that hard to work out which files depend on which and only recompile the files that need recompiling?

3. You can’t nest variables. For example you can’t do this:

<!-- $current_year 2016 -->
<!-- $copyright_message Copyright <!-- $current_year --> -->

This might sound minor. But it limits the expressiveness of variables significantly.

4. The vendor doesn’t do email support. If you want to communicate with them you have to use Slack or Twitter. I am old fashioned, I like email.

5. It only runs on Mac OS X (the clue is in the name).

At one point Hammer looked like abandonware, but owner riothq.com sold it to beach.io and active development has resumed.

Currently Hammer is priced at £15.39 (and presumably some round number of US dollars). That seems way too cheap. I wish they would price it a bit higher and fix some of the issues above.

 

nam_2003_8_14 rock carvings

Updating the PerfectTablePlan website

I created the website for PerfectTablePlan back in 2005, using a dreadfully buggy piece of software called NetObjects Fusion (NOF). The sorry story of why I ended up using NOF is told here.

Until recently the front page looked like this.

old-website-design

I had done a fair amount of A/B test tweaking and it converted visitors to downloads and sales relatively well compared to other downloadable product websites. But it had that ‘designed by a programmer’ look and it wasn’t responsive, so it didn’t work on well on mobile devices. My software only runs on Windows and Mac, but I still want to appear in mobile searches. The HTML generated by NOF was also pretty horrible. Frankly, I was a bit embarrassed by it when I looked at websites for other products. I kept on meaning to update it, but there was always something more urgent or (to be honest) more interesting to do. I finally bit the bullet and had it redesigned in 2015. The front page now looks like this:

new-website-design

The process was:

  1. I wrote a specification for the new design.
  2. I ran a 99Designs.com competition to design a new home page based on the spec.
  3. I selected the winning designer and paid them to design 3 additional pages in the same style.
  4. I paid pixelcrayons.com to code up the 4 pages in responsive CSS/HTML.
  5. I poured all the old content into the new design. Being careful to maintain the existing page names, titles, text and images etc, so as not to lose existing organic traffic.

The whole process didn’t cost a great deal (somewhere around $2k), but it took quite a lot of my time, spread over 5 months. Especially the final step. This wasn’t helped by the size (some 128 pages were converted) and general cruftiness of the old website, and my lack of knowledge of CSS and responsive design.

I didn’t want to be locked in to a CMS, so I used Mac static website generator Hammer4Mac to generate the HTML. It goes without saying that I wrote a program to help me pull all the content out of the old website and into Hammer4Mac! While Hammer4Mac isn’t without flaws, I found it a vast improvement over NOF and the new website is now much easier to update and maintain than the old one.

The new website went live on 16-Dec-2015.

So how much difference did the redesign make? Here are the changes based on comparing 25 weeks of data before the change and 25 weeks of data after the change:

bounce rate +1.5%
time on page +16.0%
traffic +6.5%
        desktop traffic -2.2%
        mobile & tablet traffic +40.0%
completed installs +1.4%
sales transactions +11.4%
total sales value +21.8%
visit to sale conversion ratio +4.6%
average order value +9.4%

The increase in mobile traffic as a proportion of total traffic is pretty clear from analytics (the dip in December is seasonal):

traffic

I believe  a 21.8% improvement in sales is a lot more than I would have got by spending the same amount of time and money improving the product itself, which is pretty mature after 11 years of work.

Overall it looks pretty positive. But, as analytics data is fairly dirty (e.g. due to analytics spam) and I didn’t run a split test, I can’t definitely say that the changes above were due to the website changes. I wasn’t able to compare all the above data with the same time period for the previous year due to some missing analytics data. But the sales data for 25 weeks before and after 16-Dec in the previous year was:

sales transactions -9.9%
total sales value -2.7%
average order value +8.1%

Which implies that the sales changes are unlikely to be due to seasonal factors.

Best of all, I never have to use NetObjects Fusion again!

format

Pretty printing C++ with Clang-Format

I use some of the code generation and refactoring tools in QtCreator. These save a lot of time, but they don’t format C++ code how I like it. For example they produce C++ code like this:

void MyClass::foo(int *x)

But I like my code formatted like this:

void MyClass::foo( int* x )

The differences may seem minor, but they are a source of significant irritation to me. I like my code how I like it, goddammit! And consistent formatting enhances readability. However re-formatting it by hand is time-consuming and tedious.

What I need is a tool that can enforce consistent formatting in the style that I like, or something close. I have tried to use automatic C++ formatting (pretty printing) tools in the past, but I couldn’t get them to produce a format that was close enough to what I wanted. But I have finally found the tool for the job. Clang-Format.

Clang-Format is part of the LLVM family of tools. It is a free, command-line tool that reformats C++, Objective-C or C according to the settings in a config file. As with many free tools, it isn’t terribly well documented. Some of the documentation on the web is out of date and some of it is incomplete. But I have managed to find out enough to configure it how I like it.

To run it you just need to place your options in a .clang-format file, make sure the clang-format executable is in the path and then run it:

clang-format.exe -i -style=file <C++ file>

Here are the settings I am currently using in my .clang-format file:

Language: Cpp
AccessModifierOffset: -4
AlignAfterOpenBracket: false
AlignConsecutiveAssignments: false
AlignConsecutiveDeclarations: false
AlignEscapedNewlinesLeft: false
AlignOperands: true
AlignTrailingComments: false
AllowAllParametersOfDeclarationOnNextLine: false
AllowShortBlocksOnASingleLine: false
AllowShortCaseLabelsOnASingleLine: false
AllowShortFunctionsOnASingleLine: Inline
AllowShortIfStatementsOnASingleLine: false
AllowShortLoopsOnASingleLine: false
AlwaysBreakAfterDefinitionReturnType: None
AlwaysBreakAfterReturnType: None
AlwaysBreakBeforeMultilineStrings: false
AlwaysBreakTemplateDeclarations: false
BinPackArguments: true
BinPackParameters: true
BraceWrapping:
  AfterClass:      true
  AfterControlStatement: true
  AfterEnum:       true
  AfterFunction:   true
  AfterNamespace:  true
  AfterObjCDeclaration: true
  AfterStruct:     true
  AfterUnion:      false
  BeforeCatch:     true
  BeforeElse:      true
  IndentBraces:    false
BreakBeforeBinaryOperators: None
BreakBeforeBraces: Allman
BreakBeforeTernaryOperators: true
BreakConstructorInitializersBeforeComma: false
ColumnLimit: 0
CommentPragmas: '^ IWYU pragma:'
ConstructorInitializerAllOnOneLineOrOnePerLine: false
ConstructorInitializerIndentWidth: 0
ContinuationIndentWidth: 4
Cpp11BracedListStyle: true
DerivePointerAlignment: false
DisableFormat: false
ExperimentalAutoDetectBinPacking: false
ForEachMacros: [ foreach, Q_FOREACH, BOOST_FOREACH ]
IndentCaseLabels: true
IndentWidth: 4
IndentWrappedFunctionNames: false
KeepEmptyLinesAtTheStartOfBlocks: true
MacroBlockBegin: ''
MacroBlockEnd: ''
MaxEmptyLinesToKeep: 2
NamespaceIndentation: None
PenaltyBreakBeforeFirstCallParameter: 100
PenaltyBreakComment: 300
PenaltyBreakFirstLessLess: 120
PenaltyBreakString: 1000
PenaltyExcessCharacter: 10000
PointerAlignment: Left
ReflowComments: true
SortIncludes: false
SpaceAfterCStyleCast: false
SpaceBeforeAssignmentOperators: true
SpaceBeforeParens: ControlStatements
SpaceInEmptyParentheses: false
SpacesBeforeTrailingComments: 1
SpacesInAngles: true
SpacesInContainerLiterals: true
SpacesInCStyleCastParentheses: true
SpacesInParentheses: true
SpacesInSquareBrackets: true
Standard: Cpp11
TabWidth: 4
UseTab: Never

It took me a few hours of fiddling with the settings to find the best combination. It would be really useful if someone could write a tool that would analyze your C++ code and create a .clang-format file for you. You would probably only want to do this once though, so I don’t think it has much potential as a commercial product.

There are only two things I couldn’t get quite right in the formatting:

  1. I couldn’t get it to add a blank line after public, protected and private declarations. I fixed this with a quick Perl hack (see below).
  2. I couldn’t get it to indent continuation lines how I would like (ideally indented 1 or 2 spaces from the first line). It is a small price to pay and I am just putting up with it for now.

Perhaps there are options to do these and I just didn’t find them.

Here is the Windows .bat script I used to format all the C++ files in a folder.

for %%f in (*.h *.cpp *.inl) do (
clang-format.exe -i -style=file %%f
)

for %%f in (*.h) do (
clang-format.exe -i -style=file %%f
perl -p -i.bak -e "s/public:/public:\n/g" %%f
perl -p -i.bak -e "s/protected:/protected:\n/g" %%f
perl -p -i.bak -e "s/private:/private:\n/g" %%f
perl -p -i.bak -e "s/    Q_OBJECT/Q_OBJECT/g" %%f
)

del *.bak
del *.tmp

No doubt there is a more elegant way to do the Perl, but it works.

I now just run this batch periodically to keep my code beautiful and consistent.

DSC_9541

Things you don’t need for v1.0

Few people launch software products expecting them to fail. But many products do fail. I don’t have any figures, but I think I can fairly confidently state that more commercial software products fail than succeed. You think your product isn’t going to be one of the failures. But so does everyone else. The only way to find out for sure is to launch. The sooner you launch, the sooner you will find out. I have banged the drum for releasing early before, so I won’t labour it here. But it begs the question – how do I launch fast? What do I leave out? Based on my experiences of launching 3 software products, this is what I would leave out.

Polish

As developers we (hopefully) all want to do great work that we can feel proud of. But, as entrepreneurs, we need to be careful not to spend lots of time polishing something that might be a turd. So ship v1.0 before it is polished. Early adopters tend to be fairly forgiving of a few rough edges, if they are interested in the direction you are taking. I spent 6 months (part-time) working on the first version of my AdWords keyword tool. It flopped. So I shipped the first version of my visual planning software within a few weeks of writing the first line of code. It was pretty bare-bones and a bit slow for plans with hundreds of cards, but it was enough to demonstrate the basic concept.

Designer website

You don’t need a beautiful, state-of-the-art website to launch your product. My own table planner software had a pretty ropey website  (designed by me) for the first 10 years and it did fine. Just make sure the website clearly conveys what your product does.

Logo

You don’t need a professional logo for v1.0. The product name in coloured text using a font other than Arial will probably be fine. I did the initial logo for Hyper Plan in Microsoft Word Art in 10 minutes. Here it is in all it’s glory:

old Hyper Plan logo

I only paid a designer to come up with something better once I was sure it was worth my while.

DRM/Payment processing

I shipped the first version of Hyper Plan without even setting up licensing or payment processing. Every time you ran it, it just put up a window saying that it would expire on a certain date and that a new release would be available by that date. After that date it just stopped working.

Hyper Plan expired window

I only added licensing and payment processing once I had proved enough people were interested in the concept to make it worth my while. If you are going to take this approach, make sure you let people know that they will be expected to pay at some point.

Sophisticated pricing model

Ideally you want to segment your customers so you can charge more for the people who are prepared to pay more. But you probably don’t understand your market well enough to do this when you are starting out. So just pick a single price. I introduced segmented pricing for PerfectTablePlan in v4. Hyper Plan still has a single price.

Feature parity with your competitors

Trying to achieve feature parity with established competitors in v1.0 is a fool’s errand. Just pick one pain point that you think is not being well addressed and try to solve that. Make your lack of features a selling point by emphasizing how simple your product is to use.

Multi Platform

If it is going to take significant additional effort to release multi-platform, then just pick one platform to launch v1.0 on.

Extensive documentation

The first version of your product should be simple enough and well enough designed that it doesn’t need extensive documentation. My Hyper Plan software has been out for a year and it still only has a one page quick start guide.

Mailing list

Many people advocate building up a mailing list of interested people before you launch. It obviously helps a lot if you already have an audience in the market you are launching into. But, if you don’t, it takes significant time and effort to build that audience. I would rather put in that effort once I have something to show them.

Trademark

Why bother to spend time and money trademarking something if you don’t even know if anyone wants it?

Patent

I’m not a fan of software patents and I don’t have any patents after nearly 11 years in business. So I certainly wouldn’t waste time and money on a patent for v1.0.

Lawyers

If a bug in your software could kill someone or destroy their business, you should probably talk to a lawyer. Otherwise a boiler-plate end user licence agreement is probably fine for v1.0.

Company

I did create a limited company before I launched my first product to get a bit of extra legal protection. But its not strictly necessary (in the UK at least).

Trade-offs

It’s all a tradeoff. Obviously it is better to have a beautiful website than an ugly one. But is it worth spending lots of time and money on designing a beautiful website for an unproven product?

The best approach depends very much on your market and circumstances. If you are a big player with lots of money and reputation, then much of the above may not apply. If you are selling web design products, you had better have a pretty slick looking website for v1.0. If you are selling aircraft avionics systems then I hope v1.0 of your product is pretty polished.

digital-certificate-sha1

What every software vendor needs to know about SHA1/SHA2 and digital certificates

TL;DR : If you digitally sign your software you need to make sure you have an SHA2 certificate and use it to dual sign your software with both SHA1 and SHA2 digests.

Digital certificates are used to prove who authored a piece of software and that it hasn’t subsequently been tampered with. Starting with Windows XP SP2 you get a warning message if you download software that that isn’t signed with an appropriate digital certificate. So most commercial software vendors digitally sign their software. We grumble about price gouging by the certificate vendors and the hoops we have to jump through to get a certificate. But, apart from that, the system seems to work tolerably well. However Microsoft have thrown a spanner into the works by deprecating digital certificates using the SHA1 algorithm. I only found out about this a few weeks ago from a fellow vendor’s blog. Thanks for nothing Microsoft. If you are using a digital certificate you purchased more than a year ago, it is probably SHA1. This post explains what this means for software vendors, based on my research so far. I am not an expert on this topic and things seem to be changing fast, so please let me know if there are any mistakes or omissions.

I don’t digitally sign Windows software, does this affect me?

No. But perhaps treat Windows unsigned software warning with some skepticism until Windows software vendors sort this mess out. If you only develop for Mac OS X you can feel a bit smug (at least until the next time Apple nukes your development ecosystem from orbit).

What is SHA1?

SHA1 (Secure Hash Algorithm 1) is a cryptographic hash function that was used in digital certificates issued until recently. SHA1 was known to have weaknesses as far back as 2005. Microsoft (and Google) have finally decided that SHA1 is too vulnerable and SHA2 digital certificates should be used instead.

What happens if my certificate is SHA1?

If you signed your software with a timestamp before 01-Jan-2016:

  • It will be treated by Windows XP SP2/XP SP3/Vista as signed.
  • It will be treated by Windows 7/8/10 as signed only until 01-Jan-2017.

If you signed your software with a timestamp on or after 01-Jan-2016:

  • It will be treated by Windows XP SP2/XP SP3/Vista as signed.
  • On Windows 7/8/10 and you will get an ugly “The signature of <file> is corrupt or invalid” or “The signature of this program is corrupt or invalid” error when downloading. If you don’t see this, it might be because you haven’t done a Windows Update recently (shame on you).

Windows seems to treat software that has been downloaded from the web (with ‘mark of the web’) differently. So make sure you test a version of your software you have downloaded from the web. I carried out some tests on 01-Mar-2016 using an SHA1 certificate to sign an executable and then dowload it. It worked ok when downloaded using Firefox or Chrome, but was shown as corrupt when downloaded using IE.

How do I know if my current certificate is SHA1?

  1. Right click on your most recently signed installer and select Properties.
  2. Click on the Digital Signatures tab.
  3. Select the signature and click on the Details button.
  4. Click the View Certificate button.
  5. Click the Details tab.
  6. Look at the Signature hash algorithm.sha1 digital certificate

What should I do if my certificate is SHA1?

If you certificate hasn’t expired you should ask the company you purchased it from to issue you a new SHA2 certificate. They should do this free of charge. In the process they will revoke your SHA1 certificate, so you can no longer use it for signing. You should then use your new SHA2 certificate to double sign new releases (see below).

I have an SHA2 certificate, now what?

If you want a new release to be treated as signed on both Windows XP SP3/Vista and Windows 7/8/10 then you need to double sign the file for SHA1 and SHA2:

signtool.exe sign /f <pfx file> /p <pfx password> /t <sha1 timestamp server> /v <installer>

signtool.exe sign /f <pfx file> /p <pfx password> /tr <sha2 timestamp server> /fd sha256 /td sha256 /as /v <installer>

Note the the order of the above is important (SHA1 first).

The Comodo SHA1 and SHA2 antimestamp server is:
http://timestamp.comodoca.com

You can add a /debug flag for verbose output.

If you only want to support Windows 7/8/10, then you can omit the first line (but why would you?).

You can use chktrust.exe to check the signature:

chktrust.exe <installer>

Note that only version 6.3 and later of signtool.exe (which comes with Windows 8.1 SDK and is also available here) supports the /as flag.

I always sign the program, as well as the installer.

Can I double sign .msi files?

I have seen reports that .msi installers don’t support double signing. But I don’t use .msi installers, so I haven’t investigated further.

What happens to software I signed with my SHA1 certificate after the certificate is revoked?

Software you signed previously will not be affected, e.g. it will be treated as signed by Windows 7/8/10 until 01-Jan-2017

How do I sign Windows XP SP1/XP SP2 software?

Windows XP SP1 doesn’t warn you if there is no signature, so you can ignore XP SP1. SHA2 signatures are not supported in Windows XP SP2. So you will need to have both valid SHA1 and SHA2 certificates to support XP SP2 and all the later versions of Windows. Its not clear that certificate vendors will allow this. Also, how many people with Windows XP SP2 (an unsupported OS) are out there buying software? I won’t be bothering to support signing for XP SP2.

Does this affect SSL certificates as well as code signing (Authenticode) certificates?

I believe so. But I don’t have any SSL certificates, so I haven’t investigated further.

How does this affect signing of device drivers?

I understand there are some differences for device drivers. But I don’t create device drivers, so I haven’t investigated further.

What is the difference between SHA2 and SHA256?

SHA2 is a family of two similar hash functions known as SHA256 and SHA512. SHA256 uses 32-bit words where SHA512 uses 64-bit words.

How secure is SHA2?

Er, it was designed by the NSA. Supply your own joke.

I don’t have a digital certificate, where can I get one?

I got my Comodo code signing certificate from reseller codesigning.ksoftware.net. They have a good reputation, and are significantly cheaper than Comodo. I don’t have any business relationship with them beyond being a happy customer.

Anything else I should know?

Microsoft has reserved the right to move the SHA1 deprecation date forward from 01-Jan-2017.

Acknowledgements

Thanks to Nikos Bozinis for first alerting me to this issue and to Mitchell Vincent of ksoftware.net for fact checking this article.

Further reading

http://zabkat.com/blog/code-signing-sha1-armageddon.htm

http://support.ksoftware.net/support/solutions/articles/215805-the-truth-about-sha1-sha256-and-code-signing-certificates-

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/32288.windows-enforcement-of-authenticode-code-signing-and-timestamping.aspx

Updates

02-Mar-2016: Added missing link and minor update.

03-Mar-2016: Minor update.

passive income

Software products are *not* passive income

Some people dream of creating a ‘passive’ income that generates money on auto-pilot while they go and learn tango in Argentina, or whatever their chosen path to the top of Maslow’s hierarchy is. In my experience, a software product is a long way from being a passive income. I know lots of people who own software product businesses. I don’t think any of them regard it as a passive income either.

While on holiday I’ve run my own business from a laptop in less than an hour per day. But the business would start to suffer if I did this for more than a few months. Even if you are not adding new features, software products require significant effort to maintain. Sales queries need answering, customers need support and bugs need fixing. New operating systems will often break things in otherwise stable products (particularly on Mac OS X). And there is always admin stuff to do: tax, accounts and a hundred other things. Marketing also requires ongoing effort, whether it be in the form of A/B testing, newsletters, SEO, PPC or blogging. If you aren’t continually improving your product and marketing, then harder working competitors are soon going to start eating your lunch. You can hire people to do the work for you. But then you have to train and manage those people. And the most capable people have a habit of going off to start their own companies.

There may be some products that can generate passive incomes. Perhaps ebooks, training videos and mobile apps. But I expect they still need significant amounts of ongoing marketing effort if they are going to earn more than pocket money. Remember – if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is…

iPhone 057

How to build a gym in your garden

Human physiology has evolved for a challenging existence on the African savannah. It doesn’t cope well with sitting in front of a computer all day, with high energy foods constantly within easy reach. But going to the gym is a hassle: get your gear together, drive to the gym, get changed, do your workout, have a shower, get changed back, drive home. Even just going for a run means 2 changes of clothes and a shower. I wanted something high intensity that I could do in a few minutes every day. I work from home, so I built a gym in my garden, right outside my office. I posted some pictures of it on social media and a few people asked for details of how I made it. So I thought I would write it up here, in case anyone else was interested.

Construction materials:

  • 3.0m x 0.1m x 0.1m fence posts (2 of)
  • 1.8m x 0.1m x 0.1m fence posts (3 of)
  • 1.2m outdoor pull-up bars with fixings (coach bolts and washers) (3 of)
  • 20kg bags of Postcrete (19 of)
  • 20kg bags of gravel (2 of)

The total cost of all the above was about £240, including delivery of the fence posts and pull-up bars.

You should be able to get the fence posts from any fencing supplier. Make sure they are pressure treated, so they don’t rot away in a few years. Anything narrower than 0.1m x 0.1m might not be strong enough. Anything bigger is going to be pretty unwieldy to work with.

You can buy outdoor pull-up bars from various sources. I got mine here. Make sure the bars and their fixings are either galvanized or powder coated, so they don’t rust. I choose bars long enough that I have the option to do wide-grip pull-ups.

Postcrete is a special form of concrete for fence posts (I think it might be called Quickcrete is some countries). You just add water and it sets solid in minutes. Leave it to ‘cure’ for 24 hours before putting any weight on it. I used 5 bags of Postcrete for each of the 3.0m pull-up posts and 3 bags of Postcrete for each of the 1.8m dips posts. You could probably get away with less, but I preferred to ‘over-engineer’ it. I also threw some old bricks and hardcore into the holes for extra bulk. You can  use standard cement, which is cheaper, but not as convenient.

scan013.jpg

You need to dig your post holes according to the height and spacing you want for the bars, which will depend on your height. The pull-up bar should be roughly the same height as your knuckles with your arms full outstretched above your head. The dips bars should be slightly more than shoulder width apart and level with your lower ribs. If you are very tall, you might need longer posts than I did. The holes should be approximately 3 times the width of the fence posts. Put approximately 0.1m of gravel in the bottom of each hole for drainage. The gravel also helps with getting the posts at the same level.

Digging a 1.0m deep by 0.1m x 0.1m across hole is difficult using a spade. I recommend you use a post hole digging tool. I bought one from building supplier Wickes for £25. The bolts were a bit loose, but once I had tightened them up it was fine. You can also rent them, but 3 days rental was as expensive as buying one new.post hole digging toolDigging the holes is hard work! I did 30 minutes of digging every now and then. Usually when I got fed up with whatever I was working on. Tip: Cover the loose dirt from the hole with something waterproof as it is much harder to move later if it gets wet.

Attaching the bars before you set the posts isn’t practical. Setting all the posts before attaching any bars is asking for trouble. So we alternated setting the posts and attaching the bars.

Setting the posts and attaching the bars is definitely not a one-person job, so I conscripted the family to help. We used rubber bands to hold 2 spirit levels onto 2 adjacent sides of a post, to make sure it was completely vertical (you can also buy specialist post levellers). One person then held the post while the other one added the Postcrete and water. To attach the bars just drill 4 pilot holes into a post and then use a socket and ratchet to tighten the coach bolts onto the washers.

iPhone 040.jpg

I also bought a heavy duty rubber mat and post caps to finish things off.

Normally I only create digital things (software, websites, documentation, blog posts etc) so it was really nice to make something physical for a change. Given my modest DIY skills, I am very pleased with how it turned out. It feels very solid and everything is pretty straight and level. Not bad for a software engineer!

Pull-ups, dips and leg raises cover a lot of the major muscle groups between them. Currently I am trying to do pull-ups and dips on alternate days. I usually do 3 sets of as many as I can, with at least a few minutes rest in between. I also do some negative reps. A negative pull-up is where you jump up and then lower yourself as slooooooowly as you can. This sort of eccentric training is very good for building strength (and also useful if you aren’t yet strong enough to do a pull-up). Just hanging from the bar is good for stretching your back muscles.

Because my gym is right outside my office and only takes a minute or so per set, there is no excuse. I also have a reminder set up in the Balanced app on my iPhone. In a few weeks I have gone from 3 pull-ups to 8 pull-ups (with good form). Once I have improved my strength futher and reached a plateau on those exercises, I may try some more exotic exercises. I hope eventually to be able to do a ‘muscle up’!

Muscle-up